All Things Digital

Friday 02, June 2017

THE EVER-WATCHING EYE

In our modern society we are on camera almost everywhere we go, from CCTV in stores, on public transport, in airports and even whilst we meander down the street. However, in recent developments, digital surveillance culture is stepping it up a notch, now combining CCTV with facial recognition software. 

In South Wales, England, digital surveillance will intensify at the final game of the UEFA Champions League on June 3rd. Facial recognition software will be used on the 170,000 visitors who visit the game and neighbouring area to the match district. Matchgoers and general foot traffic will be monitored then matched in real time to 500,000 images of ‘persons of interest’ within the British police database. This will allow the police to keep an eye on any threats and possibly prevent any attacks before they happen.  

Counter terrorism is the main use of surveillance technology however; some critics have feared that there is a ‘big brother’ out there constantly recording our every move. The consistent collation of thousands of faces collected among passport photos, photo-IDs, drivers’ licenses and CCTV footage, raises questions surrounding privacy.

Recently, the New York Police Department refused to disclose information about its facial recognition program, raising alarm bells in regards to its privacy procedures. With facial recognition software the new norm, researchers at Georgetown Law’s Centre on Privacy and Technology found that after receiving public records from more than 90 agencies across the country, that one in every two American adults are now encompassed within a law enforcement facial recognition network.

Surveillance software development is not slowing down anytime soon, with ever-advancing algorithms paving the way for more complex and sophisticated facial recognition programs.

 

Source 

Law makers and governments have struggled to keep up with new technologies and their potential uses. In Australia the ‘Facial Verification System’ first phase has launched, so that different departments including the Federal Police, Department of Immigration and Border Protection and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade will all be able to share information and photos without your consent. It is not clear in the future what other government agencies, as well as commercial channels will be able to access this data. Concerns have been raised that these databases will eventually have access to social media networks such as Facebook among other social media. The balance between personal privacy and national security intelligence will no doubt become an even more hotly contested issue in terms of facial recognition as time goes on.

 

Source

One area that facial identification technology has begun to utilise its data within is in the marketing and retail space, with the technology helping to identify customer’s reactions to products. Recently, NestlĂ© frozen pizza brand DiGiorno, used facial recognition and emotion tracking software to measure people’s reactions to pizza. More than 40 high-resolution cameras were installed to use facial recognition and emotional-readability software to gauge guests’ reactions.

Marketers will soon be able to recognise customers, and personalise an experience for them based on their past habits and preferences. Recognition could happen in the real world or online and customise the products that are marketed towards us, as well as the message within them, how they are presented and at what time. The potential for facial recognition software and big data may mean that all marketing will become 100% personalised.  

OnQue specialises in digital marketing and the art of data science. For more information on how we can help with your big data endeavours or digital marketing enquiries please contact us at (02) 8507 0395.

 

THE EVER-WATCHING EYE

In our modern society we are on camera almost everywhere we go, from CCTV in stores, on public transport, in airports and even whilst we meander down the street. However, in recent developments, digital surveillance culture is stepping it up a notch, now combining CCTV with facial recognition software.